Tag Archives: Kiwamu Okabe

Functional Geekery Episode 110 – Kiwamu Okabe

In this episode I talk with Kiwamu Okabe. We talk his introduction to writing software for hardware; exposure to functional programming; running Haskell, ATS, and VeriFast verification on bare metal hardware; and more.

Our Guest, Kiwamu Okabe

http://metasepi.org/

Conference Announcements

LambdaWorld will be taking place in Cadiz, Spain on October 26th and 27th. For more information visit and to keep updated visit http://www.lambda.world/.

CodeMesh is coming up November 8th and 9th in London. For more information, and to keep an eye open for registration, visit http://www.codemesh.io/.

Clojure SYNC will be taking place in New Orleans on February 15th & 16th of 2018. For more information and to register visit: http://clojuresync.com/.

LambdaDays 2018 will be taking place February 22nd and 23rd in Kraków, Poland. For more information, and to register, visit http://www.lambdadays.org/.

If you have a conference related to functional programming, contact me, and I will be happy to announce it.

Announcements

Some of you have asked how you can support Functional Geekery, in that vein,
Functional Geekery now has a Patreon Page.

If that is one of the ways you would like to show your support, you can
find out more at https://www.patreon.com/fngeekery.

Topics [@2:41]

About Kiwamu
Ricoh
Functional IoT
How Kiwamu got into software
BSD
Transitioning from OS development to hardware programming
What made Kiwamu want to try running functional languages on bare metal hardware
Haskell
How Kiwamu was first exposed to Haskell
OCaml
Scheme
Why Haskell appealed to run on hardware
Glasgow Haskell Compiler
QuickCheck
First pass at applying Haskell to bare metal hardware
Jhc Haskell Compiler
ATS
Experience with ATS on bare metal hardware
ChibiOS/RT and ATS
VeriFast
What the social aspect of functional languages running on bare metal looks like
Balance of ATS vs VeriFast
seL4
What the technical aspect of functional languages running on bare metal looks like

As always, a giant Thank You goes to David Belcher for the logo design.